New research from furniture search engine ufurnish.com has found that British people spend 38 days researching what furniture to purchase for their home. A coffee table is the hardest decision to make – taking 128 hours of online research and trips in-store before committing to the purchase.

The quest for the perfect dining table and chair set is the second most challenging, racking up 85 hours of research, closely followed by lighting, such as chandeliers and table lamps (81 hours) ≠ and it is not just big-ticket items where the pressure is on, states ufurnish.com, as even the right cushions can take up to 39 hours to find.

Almost four in 10 (38%) say they are often overwhelmed by the amount of choice available, whilst 31% struggle to commit to a purchase as they worry that they will see something better at a later date.

Almost a third (31%) blame their ‘purchase paralysis’ on a lack of confidence in their interior design capabilities, and a fifth (21%) worry that others will judge their choices - this was particularly true for 18-34 year-olds (36%).

A further 36% of people find furniture shopping a challenge, as they have a vision of what their dream home looks like and want to find the perfect pieces for it. However, quite often there is a difference in opinion among couples, as almost a quarter (24%) say they have opposing styles to their partner and can never come to an agreement.

Having spent so much time indoors during lockdown, 39% admit it has become a priority to find the perfect items of furniture for their home. The pandemic has also impacted the decisionmaking process, as 40% say they will be making a conscious effort to purchase more of their furniture from independent, local businesses. And, on the brink of a recession, 68% say it is more important than ever that the items they buy are good value for money.

Deirdre Mc Gettrick, co-founder and CEO of ufurnish.com, says: “Finding furniture and home furnishings is a lengthy process – so many of us suffer from ‘purchase paralysis’ as we become overwhelmed by the abundance of choice or consumed with our quest to find the perfect item."