Cameron Fry, the owner and creative director of Liqui Group, led the development of this desk, which attempts to bridge the gap between the home and the office sustainably, and with style …

Made from sustainably sourced oak and oak veneered birch ply, the Theodore Bench-Desk System showcases the group's expertise well.

“Theodore is a brand-new product that we’ve just finished designing and putting into production," says Cameron. "We drew inspiration from a bygone era where desks were more than just something to sit behind – they could become a status symbol in their own right.

“We named it after the Theodore Roosevelt desk that still sits in the White House to this day – if that’s not sustainable design, we’re not sure what is!

“We designed it to have a domestic feel. The days of sterile-looking offices are slowly but surely coming to an end – after all, we spend more time there than we do in our own living rooms. We’re just trying to make it a more enjoyable place to be.

After school, Cameron went on to study 3D Design at college – then, after completing a City & Guilds qualification in Jewellery Design and Making, he moved on to 3D crafts, specialising in Commercial Furniture at Brighton University. 

He then exhibited at the New Designers exhibition in London, where he was shortlisted for the New Designer of the Year accolade for his cardboard coffee table concept. Since launching his company, Liqui Group, in 2007, he has built it into a multifaceted design and manufacturing group based in London and Brighton, which works on design-led projects worldwide. Today, the group comprises Liqui Design (interior design), Liqui Contracts (contract furniture and lighting), Liqui Associates (an architectural consultancy) and Crate47 (a branding agency). Other than the Theodore Bench-Desk System, the group’s key works include the Trapeze Chair, the Splice Stool, the Hove Club Sofa, the Studio Easy Chair and the Paper Bag Light.

“Our motto is ‘Because things can be different,’ which refers to sustainability in design and manufacturing,” he concludes.